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    Presumption, like presume, can be used in various senses such as overconfidence or arrogance (his presumption in announcing a date for their engagement without waiting   Read More ...

    Did you know: The early Greek cities were commonly built on top of hills to make it easier to fortify and defend them in case   Read More ...

    Did you know: The Latin word texere means to weave. Texture, thus, originally referred to the art of weaving and we now use it in   Read More ...

    Did you know: Prolific comes from French prolifique, which is in turn derived from Latin proles (progeny or offspring) + root of facere (to make). A prolific artist, thus, is   Read More ...

    academic-english

    Vertigo and Acrophobia : Similar But Not Same

    Morbid fear of heights, especially when it is irrational (for e.g. when one is not particularly high up or is safely secured) – is often   Read More ...

    political-science

    Anarchy, Archipelago, Archive, Tyranny

    Greek arkhos means chief, leader or ruler and if we add the prefix an- (without) to it we get anarchy, which literally means without a   Read More ...

    Did you know: Latin nebula (mist or fog), Sanskrit nabhas- (cloud, mists, sky) and Greek nephos (cloud) all come from the same root word. Sanaskrit nabhas- later evolved into nabh (नभ) in Hindi, used, for instance, in these famous lines from Harivansh Rai Bachchan’s Madhushala (मधुशाला) तारक मणियों से सज्जित नभ बन जाए मधु का प्याला सीधा करके भर दी जाए उसमें सागरजल हाला Nebula is nowadays used in English to refer to the interstellar cloud of   Read More ...

    Did you know: Texture, which we use in phrases such as this cloth has a fine texture to refer to how it ‘feels’ against our skin, derives from the Latin word texere, which means, to weave. Texture is also sometimes used more broadly to mean ‘distinctive quality’, as in the texture of life in an Indian village; or pattern, as in, the texture of his music.           Texere and   Read More ...

    Vir, in Latin, refers to a man and virilis to being manly or worthy of a man. This root later evolved into virile and virility in English, which has come to refer to ‘masculine characteristics’ such as strength and vigour (esp sexual) and is now also sometimes used in expressions such as a virile and healthy nation or virile leadership to mean energetic or potent. Interestingly, we find वीर्  (and वीरयते which means to be powerful   Read More ...

    Latin for sew is suere. If we add the prefix con- to it we get consuere (i.e. to sew together) from which derives the French word couture and the related term haute couture. Earlier couture simply referred to the art of dress making. Now it’s often used specifically to refer to the art or business of making and selling highly fashionable ‘designer’ garments or clothing. Similarly, haute couture, which literally   Read More ...

    The yoke, much like the wheel, is one of those simple yet ingenious inventions that allowed humans to harness the power of domesticated animals – thus proving vital to the development of nascent agriculture, transport and trade. The ancient Indians called yoke yugam, the Greeks called it zugon and the Romans termed it jugum.If we take the stem of jugum and add it to the prefix con- we get conjugal   Read More ...

    Presumption, like presume, can be used in various senses such as overconfidence or arrogance (his presumption in announcing a date for their engagement without waiting for a confirmation from her, made her really angry), supposition (my judgment is based on the presumption that humans act rationally and in their own interest) and also the basis or reason for presuming something – lets now talk about the presumptions that hold up   Read More ...

    Lt sumere means to take (or buy) and if we add prefix con- to it we get the root for consume (as in, he was consumed by jealousy i.e. taken or eaten up) and consumption (high consumption of red meat has been linked to heart diseases). Replacing con- with pre- we get presume, presumption and presumptuous. Presume earlier referred to the act of taking on a responsibility, duty etc without   Read More ...

    Did you know: Education of children received laudable attention in ancient Athens. The school curriculum was divided into three categories: writing, music and gymnastics. At the age of six, the child was enrolled in one of the many schools run by professional schoolmasters. There, his day typically started with classes on writing, reading and arithmetic. This was followed by the music class in which he learnt how to play the   Read More ...

    Morbid fear of heights, especially when it is irrational (for e.g. when one is not particularly high up or is safely secured) – is often and incorrectly referred to as vertigo – perhaps, at least in parts, due to the popularity of Alfred Hitchcock‘s psychological thriller film by the same name. Vertigo which comes from the Latin verto (meaning: a spinning movement) actually refers to a type of dizziness in   Read More ...

    Did you know: The early Greek cities were commonly built on top of hills to make it easier to fortify and defend them in case of attacks. As the Greek word for peak was akros and for city, polis, such cities came to be called acropolis. The first Greek ‘states’ were in fact no more than an acropolis surrounded by a few villages. However, as their population grew, the Greeks   Read More ...

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