Archive for October, 2011

    The English word father has come from the Proto-Indo-European root pəter – which is also related to Sanskrit pitar (पितर), Greek and Latin pater and Old Farsi pita. The Greek word for father is pappas, from which we get papa, pope and papal – which means ‘relating to the pope’ – as in papal blessings or papal audience. A related Greek word patria, which meant family, has given us patriarch. Originally used for   Read More ...

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    Did you know: Before coins and other forms of token money were invented, many societies commonly used cattle as currency and an indicator of wealth. In India, for instance, the term pasu-dhan (पशु-धन) has been in use since ages; in Ireland, “cattle…were used as currency up to around 1400 CE, long after the introduction of coinage” and in some African communities, the bride-price or lobola, continued to be paid in cattle   Read More ...

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    Did you know: Latin nebula (mist or fog), Sanskrit nabhas- (cloud, mists, sky) and Greek nephos (cloud) all come from the same root word. Sanaskrit nabhas- later evolved into nabh (नभ) in Hindi, used, for instance, in these famous lines from Harivansh Rai Bachchan’s Madhushala (मधुशाला) तारक मणियों से सज्जित नभ बन जाए मधु का प्याला सीधा करके भर दी जाए उसमें सागरजल हाला Nebula is nowadays used in English to refer to the interstellar cloud of   Read More ...

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    Did you know: Texture, which we use in phrases such as this cloth has a fine texture to refer to how it ‘feels’ against our skin, derives from the Latin word texere, which means, to weave. Texture is also sometimes used more broadly to mean ‘distinctive quality’, as in the texture of life in an Indian village; or pattern, as in, the texture of his music.           Texere and   Read More ...

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    Vir, in Latin, refers to a man and virilis to being manly or worthy of a man. This root later evolved into virile and virility in English, which has come to refer to ‘masculine characteristics’ such as strength and vigour (esp sexual) and is now also sometimes used in expressions such as a virile and healthy nation or virile leadership to mean energetic or potent. Interestingly, we find वीर्  (and वीरयते which means to be powerful   Read More ...

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    Interregnum, Regale, Regnant

    Posted on Dec - 6 - 2011

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    The Incorrigible Criminal

    Posted on Nov - 29 - 2011

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    Regime, Regimen, Regiment

    Posted on Nov - 22 - 2011

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    Knowing About The Origin...

    Posted on Jul - 25 - 2011

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    Subsume, Assumption, Unassuming

    Posted on Nov - 1 - 2011

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    Patrons and Patriarchy

    Posted on Oct - 31 - 2011

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    Dr. Livingstone, I Presume?

    Posted on Sep - 5 - 2011

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